Killer Whales at SeaWorld

Killer Whale Education and Conservation

Killer whales at SeaWorld help killer whales in the wild

In 2016, SeaWorld announced that we were ending our killer whale breeding program and that the orcas in our care are the last generation at our park. Our goal is to inspire and educate guests to take action by seeing these magnificent animals up-close to better understand why protecting wildlife and our environment is so critical today.

A ticket with a mission

Your visit to SeaWorld helps support animal rescue efforts, with over 33,000 and counting.

Plan Your Visit

  • Girl at the Shamu Underwaterviewing

    This is the last generation of orcas in our care

    But, they are still here and will be cared for at SeaWorld for decades to come.

    Our goal is to help our guests, and the world, explore the wonders around them, and then inspire them to take action to protect wild animals and wild places. SeaWorld’s killer whales are vital to that mission, and while they will be the last generation of killer whales at SeaWorld, they will still be around for decades to come, inspiring millions of guests and people across the globe to take action with us today.

Meet the Whales

The opportunity to see orcas up-close has inspired millions of people, especially children, to care more about marine animals, the oceans and the environment. Below, meet the 10 killer whales in SeaWorld San Diego's care.

Killer Whales

Amaya

Amaya

(Female, Age 2)

Amaya was born during a rare winter storm in San Diego.

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Killer Whales

Corky

Corky

(Female, Age 53)

She’s the oldest killer whale in all the SeaWorld parks, estimated to be 52 years old.

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Killer Whales

Ikaika

Ikaika

(Male, Age 14)

Ike is also known for having the largest blowhole and the biggest tongue of any of the whales in our pod.

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Killer Whales

Kalia

Kalia

(Female, Age 12)

Kalia came out of her shell at around nine months old, when she began interacting regularly with trainers.

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Killer Whales

Keet

Keet

(Male, Age 24)

Keet is a gentle giant and at just under 8,000 pounds, he loves nothing more than to spend quiet time with his trainers getting “loved on.”

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Killer Whales

Makani

Makani

(Male, Age 4)

Makani is a super playful whale that loves all toys, especially ones he can push and throw around the pool.

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Killer Whales

Nakai

Nakai

(Male, Age 15)

Nakai really enjoys learning new behaviors and it seems like he can almost guess what you’re going to ask him to do next!

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Killer Whales

Orkid

Orkid

(Female, Age 28)

Orkid is known as the puzzle solver and every day she impresses us with her intelligence by learning new and difficult behaviors very quickly.

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Killer Whales

Shouka

Shouka

(Female, Age 24)

Shouka loves to learn new behaviors and her favorite interactions seem to be playing with her behaviorists.

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Killer Whales

Ulises

Ulises

(Male, Age 39)

Ulises is SeaWorld San Diego's largest killer whale and is best known for splashing water with his massive tail flukes on our guests far beyond the Soak Zone at Shamu Stadium!

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Research and Conservation

  • SeaWorld Supports Killer Whale Research and Conservation Program

    SeaWorld has committed $1.5 million over three years as part of a partnership with The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) through the Killer Whale Research and Conservation Program (KWRCP). Support of the KWRCP is part of SeaWorld’s $10 million pledge to fund research and conservation for killer whales in the wild – the largest private commitment of its kind. The KWRCP will focus on three strategies: increasing prey availability; improving habitat quality; and strengthening management through crucial research.
  • Science Supporting Conservation

    Scientific research performed at SeaWorld is carried out by our own research staff, and by scientists from national and internationally-renowned universities and research organizations such as UCLA, the San Diego Zoo and the Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute. We publish the results of our research in peer-reviewed journals, making it available to scientists, those who manage animal populations, and other interested people around the world. SeaWorld scientists have authored or co-authored hundreds of published papers.